News & Events

Surge in commercial building approvals good for plumbing industry

Australian Bureau of Statistics’ building approvals data released this week shows a 13 per cent rise non-residential building approvals in the past 12 months to April 2018. 

Master Plumbers CEO Peter Daly welcomed the news. He said the surge in commercial building, including the construction of offices and new education and aged care sectors, was increasing jobs growth in the plumbing sector.

“More work for our employers and our plumbers is vital to our future sustainability,” Mr Daly said. But, he warns, with this growth the regulations for commercial buildings needs to keep up.

“Our plumbers take on the liability for much of the commercial work they do. However, plumbers are not often engaged at design stage and can only effect some elements of the build with so much already constructed on their arrival. This can alter the quality of their install work and yet they carry the liability.

“We hope the new building regulations will work toward improving the end product for consumers and for plumbers.”

In the past year alone the building industry, including plumbing, created more than 100,000 new skilled jobs, accounting for more than one in every four new jobs created. That means employment growth in building and construction was 9.6 per cent, three times the rate of jobs growth in the wider economy,” she said. 

Mr Daly said Master Plumbers would continue to advocate for quality apprentice training for the industry and ensure registered plumbers continue their professional development as the industry innovates.

“To meet the skills shortage we are continuing to do our bit to ensure our industry has the plumbers for today and for the future.”

 Australian Bureau of Statistics’ building approvals data released this week shows a 13 per cent rise non-residential building approvals in the past 12 months to April 2018. 

Master Plumbers CEO Peter Daly welcomed the news. He said the surge in commercial building, including the construction of offices and new education and aged care sectors, was increasing jobs growth in the plumbing sector.

“More work for our employers and our plumbers is vital to our future sustainability,” Mr Daly said.
But, he warns, with this growth the regulations for commercial buildings needs to keep up.

“Our plumbers take on the liability for much of the commercial work they do. However, plumbers are not often engaged at design stage and can only effect some elements of the build with so much already constructed on their arrival. This can alter the quality of their install work and yet they carry the liability.

“We hope the new building regulations will work toward improving the end product for consumers and for plumbers.”

In the past year alone the building industry, including plumbing, created more than 100,000 new skilled jobs, accounting for more than one in every four new jobs created. That means employment growth in building and construction was 9.6 per cent, three times the rate of jobs growth in the wider economy,” she said. 

Mr Daly said Master Plumbers would continue to advocate for quality apprentice training for the industry and ensure registered plumbers continue their professional development as the industry innovates.

“To meet the skills shortage we are continuing to do our bit to ensure our industry has the plumbers for today and for the future.”